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The Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF) aims to support Pacific Island Countries (PICs) in infrastructure development through research, technical assistance, and coordination between donor agencies, development partners and PIC governments. The Pacific Infrastructure Performance Indicators (‘PIPIs’) 2016 presents the most recent data for 65 individual performance indicators as well as some comparative analysis over two points in time (i.e. 2010/11 and 2014/15) in order to facilitate monitoring of trends in the sectors included in the report.
Key sectoral findings are summarized in each section and analysis is provided on the data presented against each indicator’s trend graph or table.
In 2011, data gaps and limitations were identified which are addressed as much as possible in the current round. A new feature of the current PIPIs is it was developed as a partnership between PRIF and three regional organisations – the Pacific Islands Forum Secretariat (PIFS), the Pacific ICT Regulatory Resource Centre (PiRRC) and the Pacific Community (SPC) - resulting in improved data collection process and enabled production of a single data set to be held on behalf of the agencies by SPC. The year of the data is shown in each data set and varies according to what the latest available data was at the time of the collation exercise.
The purpose of the PIPs is to:
·         measure infrastructure performance in the Pacific and provide updated data to stakeholders, and
·
        develop a successful partnership approach between the PCO, PIFS, PiRRC and SPC.
The report covers five economic infrastructure sectors:
·         energy
·
        information and communications technology (ICT)
·
        solid waste (as part of urban development)
·
        transport (including aviation, maritime and road sub-sectors)
·
        water and sanitation (WSS).
The performance in these sectors was measured through five ‘markers’ i.e. access, quality, efficiency, affordability and safety (though safety does not apply to all of them).
 
The 14 countries included in the data collection are:
·         Cook Islands
·
        Federated States of Micronesia (FSM)
·
        Fiji
·
        Kiribati
·
        Nauru
·
        Niue
·
        Palau
·
        Papua New Guinea (PNG)
·
        Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)
·
        Samoa
·
        Solomon Islands
·
        Tonga
·
        Tuvalu
·
        Vanuatu.

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The 2016 Pacific Water and Wastewater Association (PWWA) benchmarking report was released during the Pacific Water Conference and Expo in Tonga, August 2016. This report represents five years of performance assessment 2011 to 2015.

The previous 2012-2013 PWWA benchmarking exercise was supported by PRIF, following which the indicators were entered into the IB-NET database. IB-NET is the World Bank’s International Benchmarking Network for Water and Sanitation Utilities with direct access to the world’s largest database for water and sanitation utilities performance data. Using the IB-NET website – www.ib-net.org - enables PWWA and its members to upload data directly into the IB-NET database where they are presented in the form of performance indicators, graphs, and performance reports.

28 PWWA member utilities submitted and analysed their performance results, paving the way to understanding the issues for each utility, and to create strategic development plans. This round of performance assessment was done exclusively by the PWWA Secretariat and its member utilities. With financial assistance from the Asian Development Bank and technical support from the IB-NET program of the World Bank, the PWWA member utilities are preparing to make their own decisions in performance improvement.

The database provides utilities and other sector stakeholders the opportunity to search for data in different formats and allows for simple benchmarking of utility data. The benchmarking tool enables the utility to compare itself with other utilities that share similar characteristics (e.g. size, factors related to location, and management structure). Another tool provides data on participating agencies that can help organisations, contact neighbouring utilities and others, and build local networks for performance assessment and benchmarking.

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On Tuesday 19 July, during the Pacific Update Conference in Suva, Mr Setareki Macanawai, CEO of the Pacific Disability Forum, presented a new PRIF research report on improving accessibility in transport infrastructure for people with disabilities – ‘Improving Accessibility in Transport Infrastructure projects in the Pacific Islands’. In many Pacific countries, footpaths do not offer a comprehensive network and they are generally built without reference to recognised standards for accessibility.  Furthermore, trees, parked vehicles, lamp posts, rubbish bins and other street furniture can obstruct footpaths, making it difficult for people with disabilities to move around in the community. Consequently, people with disabilities tend to stay at home and are rarely seen outside. The report covers all modes of transport – aviation, road and maritime - and includes assessment of the current situation; technical guidelines and screening tools for assessing and auditing accessibility features; recommendations for adoption by policy-makers and project managers, planners, engineers and contractors who need to understand technical issues related to design and construction of accessible infrastructure.  

The .pdf for the report and the screening tools are available separately as excel workbooks to download.

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This Report presents the detailed assessment prepared by the Study Team for the Nauru Port Pre-Feasibility Study. Although potential options to upgrade the port facilities at Nauru have been previously investigated by various development partners, no improvements at the port have been progressed in recent years and the state and operation of the existing port facility continues to present occupational health and safety issues, capacity limitations, and challenges to the import and export of goods and cargo. The Government of Nauru requested technical assistance from the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF) to investigate feasible options for improvement of the port facilities in the short to medium, in order to progress a solution to address these challenges in the coming years.

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The 2016 Power Benchmarking report is published by the Pacific Power Association (PPA) and was released during the recent PPA Annual Conference in Tonga. The report is based on data reported for the 2013/14 fiscal year relevant to each utility. This report represents the results of the fourth successive annual assessment of Pacific electricity utility performance since 2011, and represents the final round of energy benchmarking supported by the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF). At the PPA Board meeting in 2015, the Chief Executives of the PPA Member utilities agreed to contribute to cover the cost of the benchmarking initiative.

Please note the acknowledgments page for those who have supported the preparation and implementation of the project.

For printed copies of the report, please contact:

Ms. Ana Chan

Administrative Officer

Pacific Power Association

Physical Address: Ground Floor, Naibati House, Goodenough Street, Suva, Fiji Islands

Postal: Pacific Power Association, Private Mail Bag, Suva, Fiji Islands

Phone: (679) 330 6022 Fax :(679) 330 2038

Email: ana.chan@ppa.org.fj Website: www.ppa.org.fj

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This study assesses the potential and economic feasibility of LPG, LNG or CNG to meet medium term energy needs in the PICTs.

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2016 Review of Gender and Infrastructure, published by the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF).

The project involved a desk review of policies and project documents coupled with consultations with PRIF agency representatives and staff from a few other agencies working in the Pacific. There are three objectives:
• to collate information about how gender concerns are considered and managed in PRIF infrastructure programs and identify areas of good practice
• to identify lessons to enhance gender-responsive planning and management in Pacific infrastructure projects, and
• to provide practical recommendations that will improve PRIF’s capacity to support Pacific governments and other partners in planning, managing, monitoring and evaluating gender-responsive infrastructure projects.

Common approaches among the PRIF agencies
One of the key findings of the review is that there is commitment among the PRIF agencies to maintaining and increasing support for gender-responsive programs. There is also a fair degree of commonality in the approaches of the PRIF agencies. In addition, PRIF agencies have developed resources to assist their staff, partner governments and private contractors to understand the importance of gender and to increase gender-sensitivity in the design and implementation of programs and projects. Sometimes these have been developed within the agencies themselves and sometimes toolkits are used that have already been developed by other PRIF agencies or other development partners. The resources generally consist of guidelines, toolkits, templates and case studies, some of which are sector-specific.

Role of the PRIF mechanism
One of the areas considered by this review concerns the ongoing role that the PRIF ‘mechanism’ could provide in regard to gender issues. Following discussion with gender specialists and gender leads in PRIF agencies, two areas have been identified:
(i)  gender specialists and gender leads can be invited to join the PRIF Sector Working Groups;
(ii) the PRIF Document Repository can act as a ‘library’ of resources from projects in the Pacific that are designed to empower women or that include gender mainstreaming.

Additional copies of the report are available on request from the PRIF Coordination Office.

 

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Road Pavement Design for the Pacific Region – Desk Research on the Use of Locally Available Materials.  The objective of this study is to investigate options to engineer the use of locally available pavement materials to improve pavement quality, resilience and sustainability and to reduce the overall whole-of-life cost of road construction and maintenance.

The report, which was requested through the PRIF Transport Sector Working Group, explores the extent to which locally available pavement materials can be used to construct resilient low volume roads. It also sets out factors to ensure success, which include ongoing training and support, coupled with use of appropriately-scaled and resourced pavement investigation, design, material supply and processing; sound road construction practices; and knowledge of local materials and their applicability and limitations.

The study focuses on effective use of local materials and resources for improvement of low volume roads (both unsealed and sealed). However, it is stressed that while the use of more robust, cost effective and stable materials is important, proper asset maintenance is also needed to minimize whole-of-life costs and ensure sustainability.

The ideas presented in this report will require corroboration from in-field trials and performance monitoring to determine the long-term sustainability of the pavements. Trials will be conducted in association with one of the PRIF partner’s projects in the near future. The resulting information database containing relevant feedback on processes and costs that can be linked to ongoing project performance reviews will enable local engineers to reasonably evaluate material and design options, and to develop and implement ongoing country-based training and support for pavement design and maintenance.

Additional copies of the report are available on request from the PRIF Coordination Office - enquiries@theprif.org

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Transport infrastructure plays a vital role in the economy of the Solomon Islands, contributing approximately 13% to Gross Domestic Product. The Ministry of Infrastructure Development (MID) is mandated to provide and manage infrastructure and transport services throughout the Solomon Islands and has primary responsibility for roads, wharves and airstrips. Recent weather events have highlighted vulnerabilities to some aspects of our transport network. Increasingly, risks to transport infrastructure and the services it provides will be impacted by projected changes to climate. For example our coastal roads are expected to be increasingly subject to coastal erosion from higher sea-levels, and projected increases in extreme rainfall will have substantial implications for the flood immunity of some of our bridges, and the effectiveness of drainage infrastructure. The future climate will remain uncertain. However, this does not mean that climate change cannot be ignored. This uncertainty will need to be actively managed. This Guidance Manual represents the first systematic approach to integrate climate change into the design and development of transport infrastructure across the country. Over time, refinements in our approach to managing climate change will no doubt be required as we learn from our experiences, and ultimately improve the resilience of our transport network .

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Samoa Ports Authority -
Preparatory Survey report on the Project for the Enhancement of Safety of Apia Port in Samoa.
March 2015, Japan International Cooperation Agency

Purpose: To maintain the safety of port users by the improvement of the safety for ships to/from Apia Port by the rehabilitation and improvement of wharf, yard, ancillary facilities and others in Apia Port.
Components:
Extension of the new wharf, about 320m in maximum according to the largest ships. (Wharf length shall be studied by the preparatory survey.)
Improvement of the space behind the area of the new wharf extension
Separation of the cargoes and passengers flow lines by expanding the container yard (if necessary)
Dredging of the port basin (if necessary)
Others (other additional components according to the necessity based on the preparatory survey)

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The Cook Islands National Infrastructure Investment Plan (CI NIIP) outlines the Cook Islands’ priorities and plans for major infrastructure over the next 10 years. The plan focuses on strategic investments important to Cook Islands’ future. CI NIIP was assembled through a consultative process involving a wide range of stakeholders, including government, international agencies, civil society and the private sector.

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Supporting Safe, Efficient and Sustainable Maritime Transport Systems

World Bank 2015

The purpose of this report is to identify and examine key maritime challenges that are common across the Pacific Region and specific to Kiribati, Samoa, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu (henceforth, the “study countries”), identify gaps constraining the contribution of the maritime transport sector to development outcomes, and propose specific sustainable measures and action plans to strengthen port and maritime operations.

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VISIP 2015, published by the Government of Vanuatu (GoV) with the technical assistance of the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF). The report, approved by the Council of Ministers on 16 April 2015, outlines Vanuatu’s priorities and plans for major infrastructure for the coming decade — up to 2024. Specifically, it sets out a list of priority projects and recommends processes and institutional responsibilities within the Government that will allow successful implementation, monitoring and evaluation of these strategic investments. The VISIP 2015 considers both economic and social infrastructure.

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This brochure provides a brief summary of the Cook Islands National Infrastructure Investment Plan (CI NIIP), published in 2015 by the Government of the Cook Islands with the technical assistance of the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF). The report, endorsed and adopted by the Cook Islands Cabinet on 14 April 2015, outlines the priorities and plans for major infrastructure in the Cook Islands over the next ten years and focuses on strategic investments important to the Cook Islands’ future. Preparation of the Plan involved consultations with a wide range of stakeholders, including from government, international agencies, civil society and the private sector. 

 

 

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VANUATU NAMED BEST PACIFIC WATER UTILITY IN NEW BENCHMARKING REPORT
NADI, FIJI (13 May 2014) – Vanuatu’s Electrique du Vanuatu LTd was rated the Best Performing Pacific Water Utility of the Year according to the 2013 edition of the Pacific Water and Wastewater Utilities Benchmarking Report, released today by the Pacific Water and Wastewater Association (PWWA). The 24 utilities that participated in the benchmarking survey are supplying water to about 1.9 million people and provide wastewater services to approximately 400,000 people in the Pacific. Other top performers named in the report include: Water Authority Fiji, named Best Wastewater and Sanitation Utility, the Samoa Independent Water Association was rated best in Human Resources Management and Tonga Water Board was named the best financial performer. The Public Utilities Corporation of Chuuk showed most improvement as compared to last year.
“The performance of Pacific water utilities is improving but more needs to be done,” said Latu Kupa, Executive Director of Pacific Water and Wastes Association. “This report will improve the availability and quality of information and transparency in the water sector  and in this way help boosting service delivery.”
This is the third benchmarking report prepared by PWWA and it has been well received by water utilities throughout the region. Based on experience of the past three years PWWA has adopted a strategy for continued water utility benchmarking in the Pacific region.
The PWWA report presents the performance results of 24 water utilities in the Pacific region and was prepared with the support of the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF). The PRIF partners - the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Australia, the European Commission, and European Investment Bank, JICA, New Zealand, and the World Bank Group are assisting Pacific governments with improving infrastructure and services in the region.
The current pipeline of water and sanitation projects in the region exceeds $US350 million in investments.
The Pacific Water and Wastewater Utilities Benchmarking Report may be viewed in full via the following websites: www.pwwa.ws and www.theprif.org.
More information: Pacific Water and Wastewater Association. Tel: +685 30326 E-mail: info@pwwa.ws
PRIF Coordination Office: Tel: +612 82709444 E-mail: enquiries@theprif.org

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This case study has been developed as part of PRIF’s monitoring and evaluation program. It is one of a series of papers on coordination between the PRIF partner agencies and with partner governments. This example showcases a unique partnership arrangement between the Asian Development Bank and World Bank that has been developed for the Fiji Transport Infrastructure Investment Sector Project. The lessons learned concern issues such as the time it takes to develop coordination arrangements, the need for commitment to the highest level in each agency, and the importance of flexibility and leveraging the comparative advantage of each agency.

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The latest in a series of Pacific power utility performance benchmarking reports is released. Since 2011 the Pacific Power Association (PPA), the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF) and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) have been working in partnership to support performance benchmarking among 25 electric power utilities in 20 countries and territories in the Pacific. The report is the fourth in a series since benchmarking commenced in 2000.

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As more and more families migrate from rural areas to Pacific capital cities, water, sanitation and health challenges in rapidly growing informal settlements in key Pacific capital cities are in urgent need of response, according to a new World Bank report. Released to coincide with World Toilet Day 2015, Unsettled: water and sanitation in urban settlement communities of the Pacific, highlights the reasons why thousands of families in Melanesia – Solomon Islands, Fiji, Vanuatu, and Papua New Guinea (PNG) – are unable to access basic water and sewage services. The report makes a number of recommendations on how governments, utility providers, charities and donors can work together to improve access and affordability.

 

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The Government of the Cook Islands are committed to supplying reliable potable water to all properties connected to the water network by 2015 / 2016. The reliable supply of potable water affords an important opportunity to provide for population and economic growth and the continuing health of local communities.

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In 2013 PRIF released a research report called “Infrastructure Maintenance in the Pacific: Challenging the Build-Neglect-Rebuild Paradigm” – this highlighted the lack of planning for maintenance and backlog of work in many countries. A key issue in good maintenance is the appropriate allocation and execution of budgets.

The Study of Infrastructure Maintenance Budgets in the Cook Islands found that there are about ten different infrastructure service providers in the Cook Islands (covering power supply, ICT, water, solid waste, roads, maritime services and so on), and many pay a good deal of attention to maintenance, particularly those that are private companies or SOEs. However, there are some significant shortfalls and the report highlights these with a view to continuous improvement. At the moment there are no formal guidelines on how the budgets should be assigned, and it tends to be based on the appropriations for previous years. Another key issue is the process of reallocating budgets – Obviously being able to reallocate budgets part-way through a year supports flexibility in addressing the highest priorities, but it can mean that certain assets don’t get any maintenance year after year.

The Cook Islands Cabinet endorsed the outcomes of this study, and also further decided that items in capital works budgets and accounts needed review in line with the findings of the report, including the way asset registers are developed and updated. While this report is specifically about the Cook Islands, some of the issues are common to other countries as well. Many other countries face the same issues, so this study is considered as a pilot and may be developed further in the future.

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The aim of this paper is to provide a comparison of electricity prices paid by customers in Vanuatu with different countries across the Pacific island region. Data is based on publicly available information on electricity rates for different utilities and includes all applicable taxes and fees. The methodology used in this report is the same as used in earlier reports. That is comparison of the total cost of electricity for certain given levels of consumption and by major customer categories. This avoids differences in country-specific average or typical levels of consumption and customer mix when comparing average prices across countries.  Quality of service, availability, and reliability of service also vary widely between electricity suppliers across the Pacific. These factors have not been considered in this report.  

 

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This brochure provides a brief summary of the VISIP 2015, published by the Government of Vanuatu (GoV) with the technical assistance of the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF). The report, approved by the Council of Ministers on 16 April 2015, outlines Vanuatu’s priorities and plans for major infrastructure for the coming decade — up to 2024. Specifically, it sets out a list of priority projects and recommends processes and institutional responsibilities within the Government that will allow successful implementation, monitoring and evaluation of these strategic investments. The VISIP 2015 considers both economic and social infrastructure.

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This paper summarises a report, published by the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF), on the economic and social impact of information and communication technology (ICT) developments in the Pacific. It is based on the findings of research conducted in late 2014 in five countries -- Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu, and highlights impacts in sectors such as agriculture and fisheries, tourism, government, education and healthcare – but its conclusions are relevant to most Pacific Island Countries (PICs).

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The Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector in a number of Pacific Island Countries (PICs) has undergone significant liberalization and privatization, coupled with the deployment of undersea fiber optic cables, over the last decade, leading to a rapid increase in access to mobile voice and data networks.

The PRIF study on the Economic and Social Impact of ICT in the Pacific was commissioned to review the social and economic benefits of these developments and to identify interventions to further leverage and foster this development.  The study comprises five country case studies: Fiji, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga and Vanuatu, and a Comparative Report that distills lessons and identifies areas for further investment and support.

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Since 2011, the Pacific Power Association (PPA), the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF) and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) have been working in partnership to support performance benchmarking among 25 electric power utilities in 20 countries and territories in the Pacific. This report is the fourth in a series since power benchmarking commenced in 2000.

 

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Since 2011 the Pacific Power Association (PPA), the Pacific Region Infrastructure Facility (PRIF) and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC) have been working in partnership to support performance benchmarking exercises in the power utilities. This involves 25 electric power utilities in 20 PICTs.

The PPA leads the implementation of the benchmarking work; PRIF provides technical assistance for capacity building in the utilities and analysing the data; and SPC makes the data available to stakeholders and the community through the Pacific Regional Data Repository (PRDR), the Country Energy Profiles it publishes, and other avenues.

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This paper examines the use of sail assistance for shipping propulsion in Pacific Island countries and territories
(PICTs). It considers the topic within the framework of sustainable supply chain management, within which
the ships concerned must operate and conduct their functions. The paper is based on current developments
and past research and experimentation, including the ADB-funded experiment in Fiji. It also draws on the
author’s experience in Pacific shipping, including recent experience in Tuvalu, examining that country’s
maritime logistics.

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It is with great pleasure that I present to you the 10th edition of the World Bank Group (WBG) Air Transport Annual Report. The WBG has financed aviation related projects for over sixty years. However, it was only ten years ago that a formal air transport activity was established. Since then, we have presented the WBG’s air transport practice in a comprehensive annual report, which aims to outline the objectives, instruments, actions, and outcomes of our development activities in the field of air transportation.